Mount Cook

Christchurch, New Zealand

Doorway To The South Island

Christchurch, New Zealand

Doorway To The South Island

Christchurch

Nelson, the geographical centre of New Zealand. The Nelson region is famous for its year-round sunshine, long golden beaches, national parks, locally grown produce, freshly caught seafood, and a large creative community of working artists. A vibrant music, arts and cultural calendar with a multitude of annual events and festivals.

The City of Nelson is large enough to offer all the services and amenities of a large city yet is small enough to be intimate, welcoming and friendly. It is New Zealand’s largest fishing port and the gateway to a major forestry and horticulture industry. Add to this the attraction of fine foods, superb wines, an innovative craft industry, spectacular scenery and traditional Kiwi hospitality and you can understand why Nelson is a place to which holiday makers flock all year round.

The journey from the city of Nelson into the western region of Golden Bay and the Abel Tasman National Park is truly spectacular. Here the beautiful coastline is famous for clear blue waters and pristine golden sand beaches. The Abel Tasman National Park can be explored by guided walks, sea kayak, cruise boat, water taxi or freedom walking – experience penguins, seals, dolphins and native birds all set in lush native forest and beautiful beaches.

Inland Nelson is a wonderland of water adventure, including kayaking, rafting, boating and for those who prefer fishing, the Nelson Lakes area provides some of the best trout fishing in the world.

New Zealand

New Zealand is a small country, similar in size to Great Britain or Japan. With a population of only four million people it’s also gloriously uncrowded.

Spectacular glaciers, picturesque fiords, rugged mountains, vast plains, rolling hillsides, subtropical forest, volcanic plateau, miles of coastline with gorgeous sandy beaches – it’s all here. No wonder New Zealand is becoming so popular as a location for movies.

Lying in the south-west Pacific, New Zealand consists of two main islands – the North Island and the South Island. Stewart Island and many smaller islands lie offshore.

The North Island of New Zealand has a ‘spine’ of mountain ranges running through the middle, with gentle rolling farmland on both sides. The central North Island is dominated by the Volcanic Plateau, an active volcanic and thermal area. The massive Southern Alps form the backbone of the South Island. To the east of the Southern Alps is the rolling farmland of Otago and Southland, and the vast, flat Canterbury Plains.

Learn about the history of New Zealand, our weather and climate, and read visitor information to help you when you arrive.

For more information on New Zealand click on New Zealand.com below:

Mt. Hutt Ski Field

Mt Hutt isn’t just Canterbury’s own “big mountain” – it’s also one of New Zealand’s largest ski areas with some of the best natural snow around. With an altitude of 2086m and a skiable area of 365 hectares, Mt Hutt has one of the longest vertical drops in the South Island and a great variety of terrain.

It also comes with spectacular views – on a clear day from the summit you can see the Pacific Ocean in one direction and into the heart of the Southern Alps in the other.

Just a 35-minute drive from Methven village, Mt Hutt is renowned for its big snow. Great natural snow is captured in its south-facing basin and combined with 75 snow guns, Mt Hutt consistently has one of the longest snow seasons in the South Island.

Featuring modern chair lifts and world-class facilities, the area is perfect for skiers and snowboarders of all abilities. Beginners feel just as comfortable on wide, groomed runs as the freestyle enthusiasts are on terrain parks, or the world-class athletes who train at the international race arena.

In 2015 Mt Hutt was announced as the Best Ski Resort at the 3rd Annual World Ski Awards in Kitzbuhel, Austria.

About the location, Kaikōura

OUR PLACE ⁄ ABOUT THE LOCATION, KAIKŌURA

Few places on Earth possess the magic of Kaikōura. Many who visit leave transformed. It is a special part of New Zealand, imbued with powerful natural energy. A place where tectonic plates collide, towering peaks fall to the sea and ocean currents converge.

Such rare combinations lure an abundance of marine wildlife, the most famous being the Giant Sperm Whale. It was a whale that led the Māori ancestor Paikea to New Zealand many centuries ago. His descendants live in Kaikōura today. Fittingly, the whale continues to guide the people of Kaikōura and the visitors they host.

Kaikōura is one of New Zealand’s leading eco-tourism destinations offering a variety of exciting activities and experiences. Despite the recent rise in tourist numbers, the town retains much of its historical charm. Many new motels, cafes and restaurants can be found in beautifully restored old buildings. Fresh local seafood is always on the menu. The retention of the town’s distinctive character has made Kaikōura extremely attractive to artists. Their work, inspired by the remarkable landscape and wildlife, can be seen all over town.
Kaikōura is committed to protecting its unique environment and is the first destination in the Southern Hemisphere to achieve Earth Check Platinum Accreditation recognising the communities’ activities to reduce its environmental impact.

To find out more about christchurch, visit:

  • www.christchurchnz.com